Category: Parents

people who use phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5Is), a class of medications most often prescribed for erectile dysfunction, may run an increased risk of vision-threatening ocular conditions, researchers say. Read more…

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In 2019, the estimated number of global dementia cases totaled 57.4 million. That number is expected to nearly triple by 2050. Given the predicted surge in incidence, and the lack of substantial treatment options, research into potential risk factors to help avoid the condition is being closely monitored. Read more…

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Advil (ibuprofen) and aspirin are common medications used to relieve pain, fever, and swelling. While they share some similarities, their differences allow for a few unique uses. Read more…

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Constipation affects about a third of people at any given time. Many things affect how well your gut is working. But the food you eat makes a big difference. Some foods are much better than others for preventing or relieving constipation. Read more…

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• Donepezil (Aricept, Adlarity) is a first-line treatment for dementia caused by Alzheimer’s disease. It can help those who have mild, moderate, or severe disease.
• Aricept is a brand of donepezil that is taken orally. It comes in two forms: a traditional tablet and an orally disintegrating tablet (ODT). Donepezil is available as a transdermal patch called Adlarity.
• Aricept has been on the market for nearly three decades. Adlarity is a novel alternative that might be better suitable for some people or their caregivers.
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To prevent pregnancy, estrogen and progestins work together to regulate monthly bleeding and result whether an individual conceives or not. Natural sex hormones, Read more…

If you’re a parent or caretaker of a small child, you’re probably familiar with this reaction to medication. Often too young to know how to swallow tablets or capsules, most toddlers and young children strongly resist taking their medicine — and parents or caretakers may end up wearing the rejected medicine. Read more…